St. Joseph's Hospital

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Black and white photograph of St. Joseph Hospital, date unknown. Courtesy of: Ron Robillard

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Black and white photograph of Ward C in St. Joseph's Hospital in 02/29/1908. Courtesy of: The Library of Congress

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Colorized photograph of nursing graduates of St. Joseph's Hospital Training School in 1925. Courtesy of: Threadcity.us

Location

Jackson Street

History

The St. Joseph's Hospital was founded in 1907 and incorporated under the laws of the State of Connecticut a year later. It first opened January 1st, 1908 and was operated by the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph's Parish. The hospital was known for treating patients regardless of race or religion and was well supported by the community. By 1920, the hospital had serviced nearly 8,000 patients not including those who were serviced by the outside department. The hospital's needs had already outgrown its capacity by then. The hospital serviced the community until 1933.

Statistics for 1918

The St. Joseph's Hospital did valuable work in the community. According to Allen B. Lincoln, who cites the Annual Report of the Mayor ending in September 30th, 1918, the number of patients admitted during that year was 713. Out of 713 patients, 403 of them were charity patients, 68 were from the Town of Windham, 12 were from other towns. 118 were childbirths, there were 53 deaths including live births, and 628 patients were discharged. In addition, the highest number of patients in a given day of the reported year was 53, the lowest was 20, and the average attendance was at 30 patients. There were 60 ambulance calls and the average cost per patient was $14.80. In 2023, the cost per patient would have been $293.23. 

The nurses, sisters, and Rev. Mother M. Tharsilla (superintendent), were available to relieve the medical stress of war times and influenza. 

Training School for Nurses

In The History of Windham County Vol. 1 written in 1920, Allen B. Lincoln stated there was a training school for nurses in connection with St. Joseph's Hospital. Prospective nurses were trained by local physicians for a period of two years and three months, including one month's probation. Upon graduation, the graduates would receive a diploma and a school badge. By 1920, there were about seventy-five graduates.